This is a representative list of courses offered by the department and should not be used for schedule planning. For accurate and up-to-date course listings and information, Duke students should log into ACES.

Fall 2014

Course Title Instructor Section Time Room
WOMENST 89S
First Year Seminar 1 01 TuTh 08:30 AM-09:45 AM Crowell 107

Course Description

New concepts and themes in gender and feminist studies. Topics may vary each semester. Instructor: Staff
WOMENST 160S
Gtwy Sem: The Global Sixties 1 01 W 04:40 PM-07:10 PM White 201

Course Description

The 1960s in global context, focusing particularly on Europe, Latin America, and the United States. The rise of mass movements dedicated to racial, economic, and sexual justice, against the backdrop of Cold War and decolonization. The mobilization of music, film, and the body in the service of revolution, with attention also to the global backlash and the rise of a new conservativism. Course materials include memoirs, speeches, political treatises, and cultural artifacts from the period. Instructor: Chappel
WOMENST 199S
Thinking Gender 1 01 MW 10:05 AM-11:20 AM White 201

Course Description

Introduction to foundational concepts in feminist thought on sex and gender. Survey of core concepts in the field of Women's Studies and introduction to the fundamental debates within the history of feminist thinking. Instructor: Staff
WOMENST 202S
Study Of Sexualities 1 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Friedl Bdg 216

Course Description

Topics include homosexuality and theory, history, law, religion, education, the arts and literature, the military, and the health sciences. Instructor: Staff
WOMENST 208
French Love Story 1 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Languages 305

Course Description

A history of the representation and social structuring of affective relationships in France, through close analysis of French novels and theory. Examine signification of love in the life, image and identity of the French from French perspective(s). Readings from classical texts (Plato), literary criticism (Rougemont and Girard), psychoanalysis (Freud, Lacan), and contemporary theory (Barthes); and the novels of Mme de LaFayette, Constant, Flaubert, Proust, Colette, and Duras. In English. Instructor: Longino
WOMENST 214
Contemporary Israeli Cinema 1 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Nasher 119

Course Description

A comparative approach to Israeli cinema, in the context of American and European cinemas. Cinema and nationalism. Cinematic representations of social, political, racial, and ethnic tensions and fissures: social gap, immigration to and emigration from Israel, militarism and civil society, masculinity and femininity, and the Israeli-Arab conflict. Popular culture and its relationship with high culture. Instructor: Ginsburg
WOMENST 215
Cyborgs 1 01 WF 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Friedl Bdg 107

Course Description

Philosophical, cross-cultural, historical, mass media, and political assumptions about what it means to be human that serve as the foundation for technological development. Instructor: Nelson
WOMENST 239D
Women/gender/sexuality In U S 1 001 MW 10:05 AM-10:55 AM Friedl Bdg 126

Course Description

Major questions relating to women and women's place in society over the course of U.S. history, broadly defined, from the colonial period to the present: How did different groups of women see themselves as women? How did views of women's sexuality change? How did men's and women's relationships and roles change? How did women understand their connections to the larger society? How did race, ethnicity, and class shape all those issues? Course uses a variety of materials, including novels, movies, images, and music to explore the ethical contours of women's lives in the past, following change over time to better understand women's position today. Instructor: Edwards, Deutsch
WOMENST 239D
Women/gender/sexuality In U S 1 01D W 11:45 AM-12:35 PM Friedl Bdg 126

Course Description

Major questions relating to women and women's place in society over the course of U.S. history, broadly defined, from the colonial period to the present: How did different groups of women see themselves as women? How did views of women's sexuality change? How did men's and women's relationships and roles change? How did women understand their connections to the larger society? How did race, ethnicity, and class shape all those issues? Course uses a variety of materials, including novels, movies, images, and music to explore the ethical contours of women's lives in the past, following change over time to better understand women's position today. Instructor: Edwards, Deutsch
WOMENST 239D
Women/gender/sexuality In U S 1 02D F 10:05 AM-10:55 AM Friedl Bdg 126

Course Description

Major questions relating to women and women's place in society over the course of U.S. history, broadly defined, from the colonial period to the present: How did different groups of women see themselves as women? How did views of women's sexuality change? How did men's and women's relationships and roles change? How did women understand their connections to the larger society? How did race, ethnicity, and class shape all those issues? Course uses a variety of materials, including novels, movies, images, and music to explore the ethical contours of women's lives in the past, following change over time to better understand women's position today. Instructor: Edwards, Deutsch
WOMENST 241
Gender, Work, And Organization 1 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Allen 304I

Course Description

Research and theories on gender issues in the work organization. The socio-historical causes of gender segregation in the workplace and the contemporary consequences for wages and occupational status. Organizational and governmental work and family policies. Case studies of specific work organizations with gender-related problems are utilized in group projects and presentations. C-L: Markets and Management Studies. Instructor: Bach or staff
WOMENST 260
The Actress 1 01 TuTh 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Languages 320

Course Description

Explores through fiction, film, autobiographies, and biographies the significance and influence of the actress (on stage and screen) from eighteenth century to present day. Highlighted topics: actress's self-image and perception of her art; relationship between her public profession and private life; how she reflects/sets contemporary standards for beauty and lifestyle; how she provokes public debate over women's "appropriate" sexual, familial, professional, and public roles; her function as symbol/role model for her gender, race, nation. Includes Sarah Bernhardt's memoirs, Chekhov's The Seagull, Susan Sontag's In America, films All About Eve and Mommie Dearest. Taught in English. Instructor: Holmgren
WOMENST 270
Animals And Ethics 1 01 MW 04:40 PM-05:55 PM East Duke 204D

Course Description

Lecture version of Women's Studies 270S. Instructor: Staff
WOMENST 275
Food, Farming, And Feminism 1 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM East Duke 204B

Course Description

Viewing "agriculture," "nature," and "consumption" as pressing feminist themes and exploration of various dimensions of the cultural and political ecology/economy of producing, processing, circulating, preparing, and consuming sustenance. Particular focus on the ethical impact of US policy on rural farm communities and developing nations. Instructor: Staff
WOMENST 278
Sex/gender - Nature/nurture 1 01 MW 01:25 PM-02:40 PM LSRC A247

Course Description

Debates about sexuality, sex, and gender hinge on radically different ideas about relative effects of biological forces vs. social forces, or nature vs. nurture. Course changes terms of arguments about sexuality and gender and nature/nurture. Explores how nature/nurture emerged as scientific and popular debate. Evaluates new developments in science and cultural fields that are now reconsidering how biology and environments interact. Showcases debates about how sex and sexuality are formed through interplay of genetic information, hormones, material bodies, and social environments. Instructor: Wilson, Williams
WOMENST 290S
Selected Topics 1 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Allen 317

Course Description

Seminar version of Women's Studies 290. Instructor: Staff
WOMENST 290S
Selected Topics 1 02 W 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Bryan Center 127

Course Description

Seminar version of Women's Studies 290. Instructor: Staff
WOMENST 291
Independent Study 1 02 F 04:40 PM-07:10 PM TBA

Course Description

Directed reading in a field of special interest under the supervision of a faculty member, resulting in a substantive paper or written report containing significant analysis and interpretation of a previously approved topic. Consent of instructor and program director required. Instructor: Staff
WOMENST 295S
Sex Work:politics Of Sxl Labor 1 01 TuTh 06:15 PM-07:30 PM Friedl Bdg 107

Course Description

Sex work from the perspective of the labor and the purchase. Controversies over questions of gender and power, consent and coercion, sexual practices and labor contracts, trafficking and migration. Cultural representations of sex workers and their clients. Legal regimes from abolition to regulation and decriminalization. Instructor: Weeks
WOMENST 361
Money, Sex, Power 1 01 TuTh 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Carr 240

Course Description

Capitalism as a historical force in its relation to gender and race structures. The intellectual history provided by Marxist critiques of capital for the development of a distinct body of feminist materialist thought, including dual systems theory, ideology critique, poststructuralist understandings of language and culture, and the rise of globalization as the latest economic context in which to think about gender, material life and power. Instructor: Staff
WOMENST 362
Gender And Popular Culture 1 01 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM White 201

Course Description

Same as Women's Studies 362S except instruction is provided in lecture format. Instructor: Staff
WOMENST 363S
Interpreting Bodies 1 01 WF 08:30 AM-09:45 AM White 201

Course Description

How the body has come to define the human in language, law, science, politics and economics. The body's relation to identity and subjectivity. The representation of the body in particular cultural discourses and the social history and dynamic in which that representation has taken place. Instructor: Staff
WOMENST 366S
Nature, Culture, And Gender 1 01 Tu 04:40 PM-07:10 PM Carr 106

Course Description

Understanding human identity through a consideration of the human animal boundary, feminist primatology, animal welfare, the great ape project. Do women view nature differently than men? Ethics of primate research, primate gender roles, human justice and non-human animals, subjectivity and emotional lives of nonhuman animals, the relationship between gender, nature, and animals, new formulations of "nature/culture," women and animals. Instructor: Staff
WOMENST 385S
Women In The Public Sphere 1 01 M 07:30 PM-10:00 PM Friedl Bdg 216

Course Description

Why and how women who seek to practice leadership in public life operate within broad historical and theoretical contexts. Examine how American women have exercised leadership for social change over the last two centuries. Analyze current debates about gender and leadership in academic literature and the popular press, and discuss the opportunities and challenges facing women today. Explore the relationship between theory and practice by applying theory to current-day issues. This course serves as the preferred gateway course for The Moxie Project: Women and Leadership for Social Change (DukeEngage - 8 weeks in NYC working with a local or national organization serving women and girls). Instructor: Seidman
WOMENST 412S
Cap Sem: China & India 1 01 M 03:05 PM-05:35 PM White 105

Course Description

"Globalization" a shorthand for describing the period of extraordinary change that we are living through, our lives & our world defined by the internet & rapid mass communication, great wealth & remarkable levels of consumption and yet, also unprecedented polarization between the have & have-not parts of society and of the world, the emergence of E-Waste and toxic environments as by-products of the present. Case studies of China, India and S. Korea explore the question of Asian development and the linkages with the Democratic Republic of Congo for minerals such as coltan for microprocessor chip manufacturing, to examine the circuits of globalization. Instructor: Mazumdar
WOMENST 415S
Interethnic Intimacies 1 01 Th 12:00 PM-02:30 PM Carr 114

Course Description

Critical examination of cultural dynamics, political economies, and ethical implications of interethnic intimacies or "intercourse" as represented from and about Asia. Examines shifts within and beyond "Asia," asking why cultural representations matter in ways societies construct, produce, and consume objects of desire and repulsion. Texts from literature and visual culture read along with theories of critical race studies, gender and sexuality, postcolonialism, globalization, visual culture, and other representative technologies of the Self/Other. Not open to students who have taken the freshman seminar. Instructor: Kwon
  • feminism